News

We successfully organised a workshop on language barriers to academic publishing on 7th July.

The workshop had two major objectives. In the first half, Editors-in-Chief from three journals (Evolution, Biotropica, and Ornitología Neotropical) discussed how their journals try to address language barriers to publishing and how non-native English speakers can improve publication processes. In the second half, we discussed how we can measure journals’ commitment to addressing language barriers and what might explain differences among journals. Based on the discussion we are now developing a collaborative project to collect more information from journals and write a paper.

Thanks very much everyone who attended the workshop, especially the three Editors-in-Chief, Prof. Tracey Chapman, Prof. Jennifer Powers, and Dr. Paulo Pulgarín-R for their very inspiring talks!

The recording of the firstpart of the workshop is now available here.

Our new opinion piece “Ten tips for overcoming language barriers in science” has just been published in Nature Human Behaviour.

Based on collaboration with scientists working in diverse disciplines (we met at eLife #ECRWednesday Webinar back in 2020), we have listed ten tips to help everyone in science, technology, engineering and mathematics start tackling and solving the issue of language barriers in science and beyond.

Read the article here.

We are happy to announce that we will be organising a workshop on language barriers to academic publishing at 9:00 – 11:00 am AEST on Wednesday the 7th July 2021.

Please find more details in the flyer below and register (https://forms.gle/xNTXGCdAaeRrtbKY8; limited to 100 people max.) to obtain the zoom link.

In the second half of the workshop, we will have a discussion session on how we can measure the level of journals’ commitment to addressing language barriers and what might explain differences among journals. From this discussion, we will develop a collaborative project to collect relevant information from as many journals in organismal biology as possible and write a paper. Anyone who is willing to join this collaboration needs to register beforehand (https://forms.gle/9K6oscf4nsRwJ48N9; limited to 50 people max.).

The workshop is open to anyone; participation of both non-native and native English speakers in both sections are strongly encouraged, as the issue of language barriers would not be solved without concerted efforts by the entire scientific community. Look forward to discussing this important issue with many people!

The workshop Tatsuya organised for the AERLive with the Applied Ecology Resources is now available on YouTube.

Why language matters in conservation and what you can do
Language barriers in science – difficulties faced when conducting and communicating science in situations involving multiple languages – have attracted little attention in conservation. However, increasingly, it has become apparent that overcoming language barriers is key to understanding the biodiversity crisis and successfully delivering conservation outcomes. In this workshop, Dr Tatsuya Amano (University of Queensland) discusses why it is important to address language barriers in conservation and how we can start tackling this issue today.

Tatsuya will be organising a workshop on 27th May (11:00 BST / 07:00 BRT / 20:00 AEST) for AER Live by the Applied Ecology Resources.

Why language matters in conservation and what you can do

Language barriers in science – difficulties faced when conducting and communicating science in situations involving multiple languages – have attracted little attention in conservation. However, increasingly, it has become apparent that overcoming language barriers is key to understanding the biodiversity crisis and successfully delivering conservation outcomes. In this workshop we will discuss why it is important to address language barriers in conservation and how we can start tackling this issue today.

Register by 25th May here.

 

We are excited to issue our first project update of the year!

It contains the progress of the project components, and links to our recent publications, presentations as well as a list of academic journals committed to addressing language barriers.

Read the update here.

Hope you will enjoy it. Many thanks for your continued support and look forward to sharing more about the project with you.

Publishing in English is hard for many but some English-language journals do a great job in reducing language barriers.

We have started a list of academic journals committed to tackling language barriers to acknowledge their efforts and inform non-native English speakers.

We have already 15 journals listed here – all have a great initiative/scheme for seriously solving this issue for non-native English speakers. If you know any other examples, please add information here or widely circulate this list to anyone who might be interested, thanks!

A new paper “Culturally diverse expert teams have yet to bring comprehensive linguistic diversity to intergovernmental ecosystem assessments” based on a collaboration with IPBES fellows has just been published in One Earth.

We looked at how linguistic diversity is represented in eight IPBES assessment reports and found that references cited were predominantly in English and comments from Anglophone reviewers were also overrepresented in those reports.

Read the paper here.